Tag: rolling stones

The Rolling Stones – Plundered My Soul Release

Plundered my soul album cover

The Rolling Stones are set to release a remastered ‘Exile on Main Street’. While looking through their collection of studio songs, they discovered 10 forgotton tracks that never made it onto the album, which was released in 1972.

Jagger commented on the tracks, “There’s a couple that are really quite good and would compete with anything on Exile, I think.”

The first of those songs is Plundered My Soul which is being released shortly and will be available on iTunes as well as on the album, which has a release date of May 14th 2010.

Further undiscovered tracks on the album include “Dancing in the Light”, “Following the River”, and “Pass the Wine”.

Their documentary film “Stones in Exile” is to be shown at the Cannes Film Festival and features footage of their lives while recording one of the best albums of all time.

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The Rolling Stones : Top Album Facts

rolling stones group photo

After years of producing rock music that has spread around the globe, it’s no wonder The Rolling Stones is recognised as one of the worlds best rock ‘n’ roll bands. Their tracks were written in different places, studios and by various writers, and the same was for their albums being produced by various record companies yet their albums have consistently topped the record charts in both the US and UK. Their music has been inspirational to themselves and their fans and they have continued to produce great music from 1964 to 2005. Over the years, The Stones have captured the hearts and ears of their fans.

Starting their fame in 1964, the band’s album, “The Rolling Stones” was a total success. Released on April 16, their debut album became one of the biggest bestsellers in the UK, staying at number 1 for two weeks. The famous song writing duo, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards from the band contributed one song for the album. Nankher Phelge, Phil Spector, and Gene Pitney were also contributors to the record sessions of the band. The songs “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)”, “Little by Little”, and “Carol” are some of the titles included in the 12 tracks of the album.

The Rolling Stones’ albums include 22 studio albums in the UK maintaining their fame and success in the music industry. “The Rolling Stones No.2” also has an R&B feel and followed the great success of the band’s first album. Jagger and Richards, contributed three compositions to the album. Another album from the list is the “Aftermath”, their fourth British studio album which was notable because of the band’s experimentation using different sounds and instruments such as the harmonica and African xylophone.

The Stones have released 24 studio albums in the US. They also released eight live albums in the UK that topped the charts, including “Love you life”, “Got LIVE if you want it” and “Still Life”. A further 14 compilation albums were also released including the 2002 hit album “Forty Licks”, “Through the Past Darkly” and “Big Hits (high tide and green grass)”. The bands members also released their own albums; Keith Richards – “Main Offender” and “Talk is Cheap”; Mick Jagger – “Primitive Cool”, “She’s the Boss” and “Wandering Spirit”; Charlie Watts’ “Long Ago and Far Away; and Bill Wyman’s “Monkey Grip” and “Groovin”. The Rolling Stones latest album is currently called “Shine a Light Single Disc Edition”.

Since the early 1960’s, the band has created countless albums that are treasured by fans. And they remain perched on the edge of their seats waiting for the next Stones album.

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The Rolling Stones: The Core

The band members of The Rolling Stones have together made a reputation of being rambunctious adult-kids, living the life we all want: never growing up. Let’s take a look at their current members, and how they got to where they are today.

Mick Jagger has been with the band since its beginnings. He was born into a middle class English family, with a teacher for a father and a hairdresser for a mother. His paternal grandfather had also been a teacher, and as these things go, there was parental pressure to keep the job chain on the same path, along with his younger brother.

But Mick, who liked to be called Mike, had a different passion. “I was one of those kids who just liked to sing.” He was in his church choir and loved listening to singers on the radio or watching them perform.

The Rolling Stones - Mick Jagger

The Rolling Stones - Mick Jagger

He was also no idiot. He passed in school with high quality grades, earning himself a scholarship to a prestigious economics school. But he didn’t let his academic ties keep him from where his heart lay, in the world of music. A club near his school that he frequented eventually had him on as a singer even though he had never had any formal training during the previous nineteen years of his life. Eventually he met up with classmate Keith Richards, and the two hit it off. When they met again in 1960, their friendship furthered with their mutual love of R&B. Together and with Brian Jones they moved to an apartment. Jones and Richards were putting together a plan to form a rock band while Jagger continued at school. Fortunately for the musical world, Jagger left his promising school career to form up with the other guys after a rehearsal put on by Jones. They named the band after one of Jagger’s favorite “Muddy Waters” songs.

 

Keith Richards has a history of a slightly different background. Born in Dartford, Kent (the same birthplace of Jagger), Richard’s father was a World War Two vet who worked as a factory laborer in spite of his injuries earned during the war.

His interest in Guitar was sparked by his Mum’s Father who toured Britain with a big band jazz group. His love of jazz was further supported by his mother who bought him his first guitar for seven pounds.

The Rolling Stones - Keith Richards - 1967

The Rolling Stones - Keith Richards - 1967

He went to the same primary school as Jagger, meeting Mick when they were still very young (who knew they would be world sensations in less than two decades), but didn’t foster his singing voice until he joined the choir as a soprano at a technical school.

 

Interestingly, he was expelled and sent to a nearby art school in 1959. There he met Dick Taylor, also an early member of The Stones, and the two stayed up into the nights (with the help of various drugs) to work on their music.

The Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones

On a train ride, he met up with Mick Jagger by chance, and the two reminisced about where they had been and where they were going, and eventually Richards left school to go off with Mick and Brian. Obviously the rest follows in line with Mick. His mother divorced his father around that time, but she always remained supportive of Keith as a musician (and bless her for it!).

It is amazing how the whims of fate can bring random things together and make great ideas. Mick and Keith are the only original members that still are with the band, and continue to write songs as they have always done.

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The Rolling Stones – Revolutionary Rock Legends

Early Rolling Stones Group

In 1962, the versatile Brian Jones and Scottish keyboarder Ian Stewart joined with actor/vocalist Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards in a rehearsal organized by Jones. That June, the four (along with drummer Tony Chapman and bassist Dick Taylor) became “The Rolling Stones,” what would become one of the most revolutionary rock groups to hit the world stage.

Their music itself was innovative, combining American blues styles, R&B, and traditional rock. Jagger and Richards, the band’s chief songwriters, liked to peruse all sides of the musical world of the time and write based on influences they found notable.

The Rolling Stones started out their journey with a rejected demo tape, and found themselves begging for London gigs on a regular basis.Oldham, who got the band signed to Decca records on the idea that they were a parallel to the recently highly successful band “The Beatles.”

In 1963, the Rolling Stones began a run of cover titles with one of Chuck Berry’s songs, “Come On.” With their slew of cover hits, the Stones, led still by Oldham, went to the National Jazz and Blues Festival, gaining the band (and especially their star singer) an immense amount of popularity on the British scene.

Despite their successes and notoriety, Oldham saw that the band could not continue their run if they kept on playing other people’s music. Pressured by Oldham, Mick and Keith began to turn over top hits, including their original, “The Last Time.”

Their fame was also not bound to the British shores, as their hits and albums were top on the American charts as well as London’s. They had turned themselves effectively into a worldwide sensation, selling tickets and albums like all of the legends of the industry.

As far as their image, the Stones had a reputation as rebellious, sexual, and self-governed musicians that for some were almost too out there, but for the majority their lewd attitudes were just what people were looking for.

And it has served them well even till today. Their Bigger Band Tour in 2005 put them top of the tour chart once again, earning almost $440 million dollars in that single tour.

Recent Rolling Stones Group Photo

Recent Rolling Stones Group Photo

The Rolling Stones, like other rock legends of their time, found a way to take what people expected from musicians like them and turn around with hits that blew people’s expectations off the face of the Earth.

Their influences and beloved hits will live long into the future.

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